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Month: May 2017

A History of Sports Coaching in Britain

A History of Sports Coaching in Britain Overcoming amateurism By Dr Dave Day and Dr Tegan Carpenter Update: Now available in paperback (see below). A History of Sports Coaching in Britain is the first book to attempt to examine the history of British Sports coaching, from its amateur roots in the deep nineteenth-century to the high performance, high status professional coaching cultures of today. This is a title that draws on original primary source material, including the lost coaching lives of key individuals in British coaching, to trace the development in coaching in Britain. It assesses the continuing impact...

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Four Histories about Early Dutch Football 1910-1920

Four Histories about Early Dutch Football 1910-1920 Dr Nick Piercey What is the purpose of history today, and how can sporting research help us understand the world around us? In this stimulating book, Nicholas Piercey constructs four new histories of early Dutch football, exploring urban change, club members, the media, and the diaries of Cornelis Johannes Karel van Aalst, a stadium director, to propose practical examples of how history can become an important democratic tool for the 21st century. Using early Dutch football as a field for experimental thinking about the past, the four histories offer new insights into...

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On This Week – 29th May 2017

29th  – On this day in 1852 the Swedish opera singer, Jenny Lind, often known as the “Swedish Nightingale” left American after a two year tour. She had originally been invited by the showman PT Barnum and gave 93 large-scale performances before continuing under her own management. She earned more than $350,000 from these concerts which she donated to charities, principally the endowment of free schools in Sweden.   In 1902 Edgbaston became the fifth English Test cricket ground. England celebrated by bowling out Australia for just 36 runs.  German showjumper Alwin Schockemohle was born in 1935. He won the 1976...

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Women’s Basketball: The “Black Fives” 1904-1930 – Part 4 of 7

The Washington Belles, 1911 Basketball was subject to racial segregation from the 1890s until partial integration of the National Basketball League (NBL) in the 1940s and the National Basketball Association (NBA) in 1950. For African American women, ‘Black Fives’ basketball presented them with barrier’s not only based upon their ethnicity but also their gender. However, black women’s teams were still able to flourish and grow post-1910, ironically because of their isolation from a white culture that refused to treat African Americans with equity. The period, 1904 to 1950 is known as the ‘Black Fives Era’ when African Americans of...

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Hidden Histories Part 3 – Census or Censorship: Everyone Counts in Small Amounts…

Nineteenth and early twentieth century census returns tend to be the principal documents that people use when they begin their genealogical journey into identifying and learning more about their ancestors. These returns provide a decennial snapshot of a family resident at a particular address on the night of the census. They not only provide evidence that could demonstrate the golden thread of lineage but can further assist in placing individuals into the more meaningful context of family and neighbourhood and also the wider local and societal environmental framework. The patriarchal family ‘filling-up’ their Census The Census Enumerator arrives at...

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